IT’S NO FUNION

 

I cry just looking at an onion.

I cry just looking at an onion.

Cutting onions. It’s so brutal for me that it’s a statement all by itself, no other words necessary. Just think about cooking anything that starts with a diced onion…ugh. I’d love this to be a post on sexy knife skills to dice the perfect onion but truthfully, I’m still pretty crap at this step. No matter how many times my lovely chef fiancé tries to teach me his awesome onion cutting methods (seriously, his knife skills are like foreplay for foodies), I still find myself crying, fumbling and cursing my way through it. I cut, I weep. End of story.

Well, now that we’ve established my complete ineptitude in the onion arena, here’s what I’m proposing: I’ll tell you the tricks I’ve tried (none of which actually prevent me from looking like I just re-watched Titanic) and you tell me yours. That’s right, I’m proposing we play the onion chopping equivalent of grade school “doctor.” I’ll go first:

1) Place the onion in the freezer for 10 minutes or the fridge for an hour before cutting.

2) Burn a candle near your cutting board while you work.

3) Learn to cut faster to avoid exposure time.

4) Make someone else cut the onions.

image2To justify the existence of this post, here are a couple of cooking tips: Use a very sharp knife, the cleaner the cut the less tear-inducing juices will be released. When frying them, start your onions in room temperature oil rather than heating the oil first. If salting, add salt from the very beginning, don’t wait until the end. Okay, I’m not convinced starting them in room temperature oil changes anything. Your turn.♥

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WAKE & BAKE

baked oatmealThe health benefits of starting the day with oatmeal have long been touted and I can’t argue with them. Yes, it fills me up and keeps me full until lunch. Yes, many things can be added for extra nutrients or to change the flavor. Yes, it’s great for cholesterol levels and has a low glycemic index but all that starts to sound like “blah blah blah” when faced with my 20th oatmeal morning. If you’re cooking the real stuff (I haven’t opened a pack of instant oatmeal since the early 90’s) there’s only so much you can do until you’re confronting boredom in the bowl.

I’ve been hearing about baked oatmeal for a while but until now had never tried to make my own. I jumped online, goggled “baked oatmeal,” read a few recipes for inspiration and then just got started making it up as I went along. I’m a big fan of the “use what you’ve got” approach to cooking so staring at a ripe banana and a few leftover dates I immediately knew where to start.

Banana Chip Baked Oatmeal
serves 2

1 cup Rolled oats (if you prefer to use steel-cut, soak them overnight first)
1 cup Unsweetened vanilla  coconut milk (I’m sure almond works too)
1/4 cup Raw cacao nibs (full of antioxidants!)
1 Ripe Banana (mashed but still chunky)
3 Dates (pitted & sliced)
1 tsp Baking Powder
1 tsp Cinnamon
½ tsp Vanilla Bean Paste (pure vanilla extract will do) 
1/4 tsp Salt

1) Preheat oven to 350°
2) Put everything but the dates into a bowl and stir until well mixed and no dry clumps remain.
3) Place mixture into individual baking dishes or single dish and lay date slices on top.
4) Bake for about 15 minutes. Oatmeal is ready when top is set and slightly darkened.

Options: nuts (mix into oatmeal, if you sprinkle them on top they could burn), raisins, dried cherries/berries/apricots, mix in a little maple syrup if you need more sweetness, berries/peaches/apples/figs (mixed in or on top). Once removed from the oven top with- dried fruit, nut butter, jam, fruit preserves, or drizzle with honey.
Nutrition boost: mixed in- protein powder, chia seeds, maca powder, acai powder, bee pollen (sprinkled on top).

 

Before baking

Before baking

Ready to eat

Ready to eat

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